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RE: Sphagnum moss pt3

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Posted by: FR at Wed Jul 2 10:41:10 2014  [ Report Abuse ] [ Email Message ] [ Show All Posts by FR ]  
   

Sphagnum moss is a standard material for nesting many species. Lets take a look at this material, what is it?Sphagnum is a genus of approximately 120 species[1] of mosses. Sphagnum accumulations can store water, since both living and dead plants can hold large quantities of water inside their cells; plants may hold from 16–26 times as much water as their dry weight depending on the species.[2] The empty cells help retain water in drier conditions. Hence, as sphagnum moss grows, it can slowly spread into drier conditions, forming larger peatlands, both raised bogs and blanket bogs.[3] These peat accumulations then provide habitat for a wide array of peatland plants, including sedges and ericaceous shrubs, as well as orchids and carnivorous plants.[4] Sphagnum and the peat formed from it do not decay readily because of the phenolic compounds embedded in the moss's cell walls. In addition, bogs, like all wetlands, develop anaerobic soil conditions, which produces slower anaerobic decay rather than aerobic microbial action. Peat moss can also acidify its surroundings by taking up cations, such as calcium and magnesium, and releasing hydrogen ions. Under the right conditions, peat can accumulate to a depth of many meters. Different species of Sphagnum have different tolerance limits for flooding and pH, so any one peatland may have a number of different Sphagnum species.
Hognose are a xeric species, that occurs in sandy areas, Which is foreign to peat bogs. In my experience, texas, new mexico and az. they are alkaline in nature. often occurring in alkaline flats and surrounding areas. Sphagnum moss is highly acidic, very much the opposite of their natural habitat. If hogs were prejudiced about where they put eggs, It would be easy to rationalize they sphagnum would not be a first choice. As it does not occur in their natural habitat. So if problems occurred, this would be logical place to start.


   

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